September 17, 2020

04

Atlantic Moonrise 08/08/2007 — Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Ocracoke Island, North Carolina
This isn't  a competition.
No one is keeping score.
We are not being graded.
Our work is not
to do or be better than anyone else
at anything.

Our work is simply 
being as good as we can be
at being who we are.
At being ourselves.

Our work is developing
our relationship with ourselves.
Knowing who we are.
Living in accord with our Original Nature.
Being us.
Doing our life the way we would do it
if no one were watching.
What do we care who is watching?

What is our natural way of doing things
that we don't do
because it won't fit where we are?

What is so important about where we are
that ourself wouldn't be comfortable
if we brought him/her to meet our friends?

Whose side are we on?

–0–

03

Around Bass Lake 10/13/2014 10 — Moses H Cone Memorial Park, Blue Ridge Parkway, Blowing Rock, North Carolina
The fundamental duality,
dichotomy,
koan,
conundrum,
continuum,
polarity,
contradiction
at the heart of humanity
throughout time
is contrivance/sincerity.

Even when we are sincere,
we think we ought to get something out of it.
Sincerity should be good for us in some way.
And we are always shocked and chagrined
to discover that sincerity
means being good for nothing.

Because that is who we are.

Yet, how many of us are that way?
Good for nothing?

Everything is a ploy with us.
A device. 
A means of getting something,
or somewhere,
or avoiding something,
of coming out ahead,
of getting what we want--
and what we want is never, ever,
being good for nothing,
for no reason,
"just because."

Just because that is who we are.

From as long ago as the Bhagavad Gita (200 years BCE)
has come the call:
"Get in there and do your thing--
with no idea in mind of getting anything from it!"

You know,
like a child playing in a sandbox.
Like a dog wagging its tail.
Like a walk in the woods.

–0–

02

Six-point Star O6 — From My Symbols of Transformation Collection
The six point star, 
with its two inverted triangles, 
one pointing upward to the heavens, 
light and enlightenment, 
and the other pointing downward to the earth, 
darkness and abject cluelessness, 
reflects the eternal plight 
of human beings throughout time, 
living out our lives between 
the best and worst 
we can do, be, become,
in each situation as it arises,
moment-by-moment-by-moment.

"We have met the enemy,
and they are us!"
(Walt Kelly)

–0–

01

Eno River Fall 11/9/2011 — Eno River State Park, Durham, North Carolina
Joseph Campbell said the Bhagavad Gita
could be summarized with:
"Get in there and do your thing,
and don't worry about the outcome!"

The outcome is always messing with us.
We live from one outcome to another.
We are always trying to achieve some outcome.
Always invested in some outcome.
Always enamored by some outcome.
Always attached to some outcome.

We do "this" so "that" will happen--
or to keep "that" from happening.

Doing "this" so "this" will happen
is the whole point of playing.
Living is a serious matter
and can only be engaged in
by those who do "this" so "that" will happen,
or not happen.

Doing our thing
"without hope,
without witness,
without reward,
(Steven Moffat)
is, for us, the greatest absurdity.

But.

Doing our thing
for the sole purpose,
entire point,
and complete joy
of doing our thing
is the very essence
of being alive.

Alan Stacell said, 
“I paint like a dog wags its tail.”

What do you do 
like a dog wags its tail?
How often do you do it?
How long do you do it
when you do it?

Why not do it more often?
For longer periods of time?

Without ever having an eye on the outcome?

Published by jimwdollar

I'm retired, and still finding my way--but now, I don't have to pretend that I know what I'm doing. I retired after 40.5 years as a minister in the Presbyterian Church USA, serving churches in Louisiana, Mississippi and North Carolina. I graduated from Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, in Austin, Texas, and Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. My wife, Judy, and I have three daughters, three sons-in-law, and five granddaughters, and are enjoying our retirement as much as we have ever enjoyed anything.

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