May 26, 2021

o1

String Lake Reflection Oil Paint Rendered — Grand Teton National Park, Jackson, Wyoming
Think of the Doctrines of Heaven and Hell
as Bribery and Extortion.

It makes sense,
coming as they do 
from the priests 
of organized religion.

It is a rule never mentioned:
First came religion,
then came theology.

Religion's primary motivation 
is not serving its theology.
Its theology is a tool it uses
to keep itself going.
That is religion's primary motivation.
To keep itself going.

Everything you hear from religion
is designed to keep it going.
And, more than that,
to keep those in charge of religion going.

It's another scam.
That plays on the fundamental theme
at the heart of life itself.

We all need to find something
to keep us going.
The people at the driving force
of religion 
keep themselves going
by telling the people things
that keep them going.

The people who are self-directed,
self-propelled,
self-charging,
self-motivating,
self-correcting,
self-aware,
etc.
are a rare find.

Organic,
internal,
intrinsic,
from the inside out,
and the ground up,
living 
finds itself in the category
of unicorns and leprechauns. 

We hear about it,
but we never see it.
People talk about it,
as I am doing now,
but where do you go to witness it?
To buy it?
To possess it?

And why would you?
Or, if you want to be self-directing,
why don't you just be self-directing?
Why is that so hard?
Why is it so difficult that nobody does it?

What is it that keeps us going?

What do you intend with your life?
What do you mean by being alive?
For what are you living?

We are living to be comfortable, right?
To be happy.
To be content.
To be alive.
Why is that so hard?
Why is it a problem to keep ourselves going?

Any religion worth its keep
ought to be able to offer
an intrinsic, self-perpetuating,
ground of life and being.

But, then, that religion
would be out of business
like that (snaps fingers).

And the economy would be dust and ashes.

Published by jimwdollar

I'm retired, and still finding my way--but now, I don't have to pretend that I know what I'm doing. I retired after 40.5 years as a minister in the Presbyterian Church USA, serving churches in Louisiana, Mississippi and North Carolina. I graduated from Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, in Austin, Texas, and Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. My wife, Judy, and I have three daughters and five granddaughters within about twenty minutes from where we live--and are enjoying our retirement as much as we have ever enjoyed anything.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: